Archive | February, 2014

A Winter’s tale, part deux: Heart healthy chocolate chip cookies with olive oil and oat flour

18 Feb

Hello, gentle readers.

Hallelujah

Hallelujah

This is something of a continuation of the Winter’s lament from my last post. As previously mentioned, I’ve been obsessed with chocolate chip cookies lately. One day I made the mistake of doing the butter math in my head, and came to the conclusion that I’d consumed well over a pound of butter so far this season, in homemade cookies alone. Paula Deen would be proud, but me? Not so much. As a runner, I often excuse my sweet tooth because I run off a lot of those calories and try to eat balanced meals for the most part (sometimes “balance” means salad for lunch so I can have pizza for dinner, but you get the idea). While I don’t think there’s anything wrong with splurging on dessert if you have an otherwise healthy lifestyle, I think I’ve been taking it too far with my cookie game. Hence, this post.

I’ve always heard that olive oil is a more heart healthy fat because it’s low in saturated fat and cholesterol (for more science speak, read on here). Olive oil also has a pretty distinct taste, but I had seen it incorporated into cake recipes and other sweet treats, so I figured there had to be a chocolate chip cookie out there somewhere that used EVOO instead of butter. I also wanted a cookie that didn’t rely on AP flour, which doesn’t really provide any nutritional benefits. I often use whole wheat flour, but it can overwhelm the other ingredients with its hearty flavor and grittier texture. Enter, oat flour. Look for oat flour sold in bulk at specialty markets and Whole Foods and it’s super cheap and easily replaces AP flour in most recipes, with the added benefit of lots of fiber and protein (Bob’s Red Mill also sells it pre-packaged).

The final result? A cookie that is crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside, and leaves you feeling full and satisfied. For recipe, see below.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Chocolate chip cookies with olive oil

Adapted from this recipe

Ingredients:
2 ¼ cup oat flour (or flour of choice)
1 ½ tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp. vanilla extract
¾ cup granulated sugar
¾ cup brown sugar
2 eggs
1-2 cups chocolate chips*

*To each their own. I used a bag of Trader Joe’s semi-sweet chunks, they melt great. I think next time I will add almond slices and chia seeds.

Instructions:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Combine sugars, vanilla, olive oil, salt, and baking soda. Beat in the eggs one a time. I strongly recommend a stand mixer as the dough is unusually dense/sticky and tough to work with by hand. Make sure you scrape down the sides of the bowl, and around the bottom, to thoroughly combine. Gradually beat in the flour and stir in the chocolate chips.

*A note (novel) on resting the dough: I am a firm believer in the power of letting your cookie dough rest before baking (for more on the science behind this and other aspects of cookie baking, check this out). I found that to be especially beneficial here because of the distinct flavor of olive oil. In order to reconcile my gotta-have-it-now attitude toward CCCs, and the benefits of resting my dough, I’ve gotten into a habit of baking only one small tray right after I’ve made my dough, and then refrigerating or freezing the rest for at least a day. When I made my first tray of these cookies following this protocol, the results satisfied my craving, but I was not terribly impressed because they had a distinct aftertaste (probably exaggerated by the fact that I slightly overbaked them, leaving the crisp edges tasting slightly bitter). When I made the remaining batches a day or two later I was a complete convert. I couldn’t taste the olive oil at all, made sure not to overbake them, and they were the most perfect chewy texture and rich balanced flavor.

Place spoonfuls of dough a couple inches apart on a parchment-lined baking sheet (or greased sheet). Apologies for not having any photos of the dough before baking.

Bake for 8-11 minutes, until lightly golden at the edges and set. Watch carefully at the end of baking time as these overcook quickly, so it’s better to take them out a bit early if you’re unsure. Allow to cool for a bit to set up, and enjoy!

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A Winter’s tale: Sweet potato brownies

13 Feb

Let’s pretend it hasn’t been almost a year since I did this…

Did someone say "yum"?

Did someone say “yum”?


If you are in the Northeast, you know we have been having a particularly brutal winter. As you might expect, this weather does not lend itself to healthy eating habits. For me this means that for the past couple months I have been obsessed with chocolate chip cookies. Seriously obsessed, I think about them all the time and about how I will get my next fix. If I wanted to right now I could share a recipe for the most delicious browned butter chocolate chip cookie you’ve ever eaten, but I can’t do it. I’ve made three batches of said cookie and have eaten 95% of the results myself. I have no portion control when it comes to CCCs. Which is why you’re getting this post instead, about a healthier alternative to a fudge brownie. With no butter/oil and only natural sweeteners, they are packed with nutrients and fiber that will leave you with little baker’s remorse. I will not lie and say that they are as rich/amazing as a brownie packed with real butter and sugar, but armed with the realistic expectations I just gave you, they are pretty damn good, and provide much less guilt if your Winter habits mirror my own.

The final result is definitely chocolatey, though I would up the ante even more next time with additional cocoa powder, maybe a dash of espresso powder, and nuts or raw cacao nibs for texture (or chocolate chips if your desire for a healthy dessert only gets you so far). The texture is super moist and fudgy, and for me falls somewhere in between a fudge brownie and a chocolate bread pudding. Very yummy. Recipe below.

Sweet potatoes mixin'

Sweet potatoes mixin’


Adding the chocolate

Adding the chocolate


Sweet potato brownies
Adapted from Deliciously Ella

Ingredients:
2 medium to large sweet potatoes
2/3 of a cup of ground almonds (almond meal/almond flour)
1/2 a cup of whole wheat flour or flour of choice (I’ll try oat next time, and I might add another 1/4 cup)
1 egg
2 oz chopped unsweetened chocolate (I used two Baker’s squares)
3 tablespoons cocoa powder
1/4 cup pure maple syrup + 1 tablespoon milk
2 tablespoons chia seeds
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
Stevia extract (dropper-full)*
Chocolate chips for topping (optional)
*the original recipe calls for 14 pitted dates to sweeten the batter, which I didn’t have, though I think it would be great.

Instructions:
Heat up the maple syrup with the milk for about 20 seconds in the microwave to warm it, then add the chia seeds and stir. Leave out while you prepare the recipe so that the chia seeds have time to absorb some liquid.

Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees, then peel the sweet potatoes. I wrapped mine in foil and baked at 375 for an hour or so, but still had to zap them for a few minutes after that. You want them very soft so that they’ll mix into a creamy consistency, so next time I’ll probably chop them into large chucks and steam them instead of baking whole.

Once soft, add them to a stand mixer and beat on medium-high until it’s a smoooth consistency. Add the chopped chocolate while the sweet potatoes are still warm, so it melts and blends in. Add cocoa powder and mix. Add chia seed-syrup-milk mixture, 10 drops of stevia extract (or healthy sweetener of your choice, to taste), and the egg. Beat to incorporate. Mix in baking powder and salt. Lastly mix in flour. (This is the point where I forgot to add cacao nibs, so do so here if you’re so inclined).

Spread batter into a greased 9 x 9 baking dish and cook for about 20-25 minutes, until you can pierce with a fork bringing it out dry (or dry-ish, might take a bit longer). Allow it to cool for about ten minutes. If you still need a bit more richness, like I did, sprinkle dark chocolate chips on top, and press gently into the surface. Cut and enjoy!

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